Will California’s taxpayers ever pay enough?

By Jon Coupal | Every day it seems like the California Legislature careens further off the rails, and we’re not just talking about the state’s infamous high speed rail project. The rapidity of tax increase proposals that would punish both citizen and business taxpayers is breathtaking. Particularly astounding is the fact that new revenue simply isn’t needed given our highest-in-the-nation income tax rate, state sales tax rate and a litany of other tax metrics that cause residents of other states to fall to their knees in gratitude that they don’t live here. (That is especially true for the millions of former Californians who have escaped to lower tax states).

A weekly column by Jon CoupalEven more ironic is that these tax increase proposals are being advanced in a state with a massive $15 billion budget surplus and a recent series of corporate IPOs that will bring billions more into state coffers. When is enough enough?

Since January, new tax increase proposals include a tax on soda (AB138); car batteries (AB142); residential water use (AB217); firearms (AB18); automobile tires (AB755); pain medication (AB1468); oil severance (SB246); inheritances (SB378); and a sales tax on services (SB22). Combined, these proposals, plus several more, would impose hundreds of billions of dollars in higher taxes on Californians. If state politicians are trying to depopulate the state, they’ve come up with a pretty good plan. It is unknown how many of these tax hikes will advance all the way through the legislative process to enactment. A significant hurdle is Prop. 13’s requirement that taxes imposed at the state level receive a two-thirds vote of both the Assembly and Senate. But with Democrats having achieved that threshold in the 2018 elections, the odds are better now than they have been in 40 years.

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